Choosing a Rehab Program

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Filed under Education

The doctor and other hospital staff will provide information and advice about rehabilitation programs, but the patient and family make the final choice. Hospital staff know the patient’s disabilities and medical condition.

They should also be familiar with the rehabilitation programs in the community and should be able to answer questions about them. The patient and family may have a preference about whether the patient lives at home or at a rehabilitation facility. They may have reasons for preferring one program over another. Their concerns are important and should be discussed with hospital staff.

Things To Consider When Choosing a Rehabilitation Program

  • Does the program provide the services the patient needs?
  • Does it match the patient’s abilities or is it too demanding or not demanding enough?
  • What kind of standing does it have in the community for the quality of the program?
  • Is it certified and does its staff have good credentials?
  • Is it located where family members can easily visit?
  • Does it actively involve the patient and family members in rehabilitation decisions?
  • Does it encourage family members to participate in some rehabilitation sessions and practice with the patient?
  • How well are its costs covered by insurance or Medicare?
  • If it is an outpatient or home program, is there someone living at home who can provide care?
  • If it is an outpatient program, is transportation available?

A person may start rehabilitation in one program and later transfer to another. For example, some patients who get tired quickly may start out in a less intense rehabilitation program. After they build up their strength, they are able to transfer to a more intense program.

When Rehabilitation Is Not Recommended
Some families and patients may be disappointed if the doctor does not recommend rehabilitation. However, a person may be unconscious or too disabled to benefit. For example, a person who is unable to learn may be better helped by maintenance care at home or in a nursing facility. A person who is, at first, too weak for rehabilitation may benefit from a gradual recovery period at home or in a nursing facility. This person can consider rehabilitation at a later time. It is important to remember that:

Hospital staff are responsible for helping plan the best way to care for the patient after discharge from acute care. They can also provide or arrange for needed social services and family education.

This is not the only chance to participate in rehabilitation. People who are too disabled at first may recover enough to enter rehabilitation later.

Tags: Geriatrics, Healthcare, Nursing home, Rehabilitation medicine, Nursing, Stroke recovery, Geriatric rehabilitation, Healthcare in the United States
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